PREP CLASS STUDENTS’ THOUGHTS ON USING LITERARY SOURCES IN READING LESSONS


ÖZSEVGEÇ Y.

1st International Blacksea Conference on Language and Language Education, Samsun, Turkey, 22 - 23 September 2017, pp.533-538

  • Publication Type: Conference Paper / Full Text
  • City: Samsun
  • Country: Turkey
  • Page Numbers: pp.533-538

Abstract

Preparing or arranging course materials for the reading lessons is a challenging process that most teachers prefer to use the books, articles or short stories. Literary works are common materials used in those lessons, because of their accessibility and ease of use. Regarding that situation, the purpose of this study is to gather the prep class students’ thoughts about literary works as a course material and examine the data by taking into consideration the national identity and class distinction. In this case study, Jane Austen’s two novels Pride and Prejudice and Sense and Sensibility are discussed in reading lessons from 27th of February to 31st March 2017 as course materials in prep classes. In her works, Jane Austen focuses on the class distinction by giving specific examples of her time. The ways they eat and behave are determined by the strict rules of the society in 1850.  At the ends of this process, totally 19 students are asked to complete an unstructured form to express their thoughts on these books.

The result shows that the students take part in the study give different answers about using literary sources in prep classes. Almost half of the students state that choosing sources from literature make them aware of author’s intentions, and the contextual factors such as the political, social, and historical background of the text.[1] Data is also evaluated according to the national identity of the students in order to find out their opinions on class distinction and the relation of the language, culture, and literature.

Key Words: Literature, ELT, Social Context, Jane Austen

 


[1] Also look, Khatip Mohammad, Literature in EFL/ESL Classroom, English Language Teaching, Vol. 4, No. 1; March 2011, (201-208), 206.