Can stress-related growth be enhanced by psychoeducational group intervention? A randomized controlled trial


Yazıcı Kabadayı S., Öztemel K.

CURRENT PSYCHOLOGY, vol.0, 2024 (SSCI)

  • Publication Type: Article / Article
  • Volume: 0
  • Publication Date: 2024
  • Doi Number: 10.1007/s12144-024-05903-y
  • Journal Name: CURRENT PSYCHOLOGY
  • Journal Indexes: Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI), Scopus, IBZ Online, BIOSIS, Business Source Elite, Business Source Premier, Psycinfo
  • Recep Tayyip Erdoğan University Affiliated: Yes

Abstract

Stress is an essential part of life. Stress, which is often associated with psychopathology, also offers opportunities for development and growth. We believe that focusing on the positive outcomes of stressful situations will be beneficial for mental health in the long term. The present study investigated the effect of the stress-related growth (SRG) psychoeducation program on the SRG level of Turkish university students. The sample consisted of 28 participants. The intervention group (n = 14) received a 10-session SRG psychoeducation program, whereas the control group (n = 14) did not receive any intervention. SRG scores increased after the intervention for participants in the intervention group, and this increase continued at follow-up measurements. No significant changes were observed in the control group. The results showed that the intervention had a large effect size in increasing SRG levels in non-clinical populations. The intervention seems promising for increasing the SRG level of individuals facing stressful situations. We recommend that SRG-targeted interventions should be conducted as part of preventive and protective mental health studies in non-clinical populations.

Stress is an essential part of life. Stress, which is often associated with psychopathology, also offers opportunities for development and growth. We believe that focusing on the positive outcomes of stressful situations will be beneficial for mental health in the long term. The present study investigated the effect of the stress-related growth (SRG) psychoeducation program on the SRG level of Turkish university students. The sample consisted of 28 participants. The intervention group (n = 14) received a 10-session SRG psychoeducation program, whereas the control group (n = 14) did not receive any intervention. SRG scores increased after the intervention for participants in the intervention group, and this increase continued at follow-up measurements. No significant changes were observed in the control group. The results showed that the intervention had a large effect size in increasing SRG levels in non-clinical populations. The intervention seems promising for increasing the SRG level of individuals facing stressful situations. We recommend that SRG-targeted interventions should be conducted as part of preventive and protective mental health studies in non-clinical populations.